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Dr. Adam D. Mark's picture

Coming to our Office next month!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

By Dr. Adam D. Mark - Posted on 12 April 2014

As described in the Macular Anatomy section, Macular Pigment protects the macula from free-radical damage caused by blue wavelength light. A risk factor for developing AMD is low Macular Pigment Optical Density (MPOD). There is now a device called the Densitometer that measures MPOD, the relative health of your macula. The macula is the sight-sensing center in the back of the eye

Dr. Adam D. Mark's picture

Get outdoors to help reduce myopia progression. Put down the phones and ipads

By Dr. Adam D. Mark - Posted on 14 March 2014

Increased Cases Of Myopia Attributed To Too Much Time Spent Indoors.

Dr. Caren Brill's picture

New technology: Eye cells can be printed by inkjet!

By Dr. Caren Brill - Posted on 19 December 2013

Researchers in the UK have succeeded in printing adult eye cells using an inkjet printer. The loss of nerve cells in the retina causes many eye diseases that lead to blindness. While early in development, this work can lead to printing a replacement retina for those who have suffered vision loss from these diseases!

Read more here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25405542

Dr. Steve Silberberg's picture

YOu have to be nuts not to eat nuts

By Dr. Steve Silberberg - Posted on 21 November 2013

Study Links Nuts To Lower Heart Disease, Cancer Death Risk.
NBC Nightly News reported, “While they may not be a fountain of youth, the research from the New England Journal of Medicine suggests a handful or so of nuts every day could be a lifesaver.” Researchers at Dana-Farber, Harvard, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital found that “people who ate one ounce of nuts seven times a week were 20 percent less likely to die from a variety of causes: heart disease, stroke, cancer, respiratory illness, kidney disease and infection.”

Dr. Adam D. Mark's picture

Anti - Seizure Medication has ocular side effects!!

By Dr. Adam D. Mark - Posted on 01 November 2013

WARNING: RETINAL ABNORMALITIES AND POTENTIAL VISION LOSS

• POTIGA can cause retinal abnormalities with funduscopic features similar to those
seen in retinal pigment dystrophies, which are known to result in damage to the
photoreceptors and vision loss.

• Some patients with retinal abnormalities have been found to have abnormal visual
acuity. It is not possible to determine whether POTIGA caused this decreased visual
acuity, as baseline assessments are not available for these patients.

• Approximately one third of the patients who had eye examinations performed after

Dr. Adam D. Mark's picture

Halloween Contact lenses

By Dr. Adam D. Mark - Posted on 25 October 2013

FDA Warns Against Use Of Decorative Contact Lenses.

Dr. Caren Brill's picture

Importance of eye exams for diabetics!

By Dr. Caren Brill - Posted on 08 October 2013

All diabetics should have an eye exam twice a year! This article based on a study from Australia discusses the risk of blindness from diabetes:
A new report finds that 60 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes will develop eye disease within 20 years of their diagnosis and it will affect all people with Type 1 diabetes.

If you or someone in your family has diabetes and has not had an eye exam in the last 6 months, call to schedule an exam today!

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/hundreds-of-thousands-at-risk-of...

Dr. Caren Brill's picture

Great advice for all of our Contact Lens wearers!

By Dr. Caren Brill - Posted on 26 September 2013

A guide of the common mistakes soft contact lens wearers make, what should be done instead, and the worst that can happen with poor hygiene. You might be convinced to change your bad habits for good!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/26/contact-lens-hygiene-questions-...

Dr. Steve Silberberg's picture

Cataract surgery linked to lower death rate

By Dr. Steve Silberberg - Posted on 09 September 2013

Study: Cataract Surgery Linked To Lower Death Risk.
According to a study published in the September issue of the journal Ophthalmology, patients with cataracts who undergo eye surgery to improve their sight “had a 40 percent lower long-term risk of death than those who did not have surgery,” HealthDay Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/6) reported. The study “looked at 354 people, 49 and older, in Australia with cataract-related vision loss who underwent an initial assessment between 1992 and 2007 and had follow-up visits five and 10 years after the first exam.”

Doctor Silberberg

Dr. Steve Silberberg

Founder
An Eye to the Future
more about Dr. Silberberg

Doctor Mark

Dr. Adam Mark

Partner
An Eye to the Future
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Doctor Brill

Dr. Caren Brill

An Eye to the Future
more about Dr. Brill

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